Parenting

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Advice to Parents on Diagnosing and Treating Anxiety Disorders in Young People

Dr. Francis Lee, is the Mortimer D. Sackler Professor and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College, and an attending psychiatrist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital.

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Advice for Parents on Early Signs of Schizophrenia

Dr. Dolores Malaspina applied to medical school with one aim–to understand the illness, schizophrenia, that afflicts her younger sister.

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Seeds of Psychosis: Rejecting Parenting Myths, Revealing Underlying Genetic Origins

The search for the seeds of psychosis goes back to the very start of psychiatry. In the late 19th century, Emil Kraepelin, one of the first adherents of the idea that mental disorders have biological causes, described psychosis as a form of early-onset dementia.

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Diagnosing Early-Onset Depression in Young Children

There was a longstanding belief that pre-pubescent children were too developmentally and cognitively immature to experience the core aspects of depression. In the mid-1980s research studies disputed those claims. By the late ‘80s, it was widely accepted that children ages six and older could experience clinical depression. Subsequently, treatment studies looked at various forms of psychotherapy and psychopharmacology for that age group. Recent studies, including ours at Washington University, have extended that story down to age three.

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Neurofeedback App Improves Early Cognitive Deficit

In adults, bipolar disorder is characterized by swings from severe states of depression to states of either mania or hypomania (a less intense form of mania). A full manic episode usually lasts at least a week, although for some people it can last several weeks.

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