Neurobiology of Stress, Depression and Antidepressants: Remodeling Synaptic Connections

Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Neurobiology of Stress, Depression and Antidepressants: Remodeling Synaptic Connections

Watch Video Recording:

Presented by 
Ronald S. Duman, Ph.D.
Ronald S. Duman, Ph.D.
Yale University

Elizabeth Mears and House Jameson Professor of Psychiatry

Professor of Neurobiology and of Pharmacology

Director, Division of Molecular Psychiatry and Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities

Scientific Council Member (Joined 2004)

2002 Falcone Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Affective Disorders Research (Colvin Prize)

2005 Distinguished Investigator Grant

1997 Independent Investigator Grant

1989 Young Investigator Grant

Studies from Dr. Duman’s laboratory have contributed to the characterization of the molecular and cellular actions of antidepressants and stress, providing the basis for a neurotrophic hypothesis of depression. Dr. Duman’s research has shown that antidepressants increase the growth and survival of new neurons and glia, which he believes may explain in part how these drugs produce their therapeutic effects. These findings represent major advances in the understanding of the effects of antidepressants and provide a framework for the development of novel therapeutic agents.

Dr. Duman conducted postgraduate work at Yale University before joining the Yale faculty.

Moderated by 
Jeffrey Borenstein, M.D.
Brain & Behavior Research Foundation

President and CEO

Jeffrey Borenstein, M.D., serves as the President & CEO of the Brain & Behavior Research Foundation, the largest private funder of mental health research grants. Dr. Borenstein developed the Emmy Award-nominated public television program “Healthy Minds,” and serves as host of the series. The program, which is broadcast nationwide, focuses on topics in psychiatry in order to educate the public, reduce stigma and offer a message of hope. Dr. Borenstein also serves as Editor-in-Chief of Psychiatric News, the newspaper of the American Psychiatric Association and as an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.